Thursday, April 24, 2008

Teacher's Pest?

Why should all teachers expect a 2.45% pay increase?

The best teachers should be able to look forward to higher pay increases and the worst teachers should expect nothing. I suspect the National Union of Teachers opposes performance related pay...

5 comments:

Edwin Greenwood said...

I have no doubt that the NUT are opposed to performance-related pay. Frankly, I'm not too keen on it myself. In my experience of working for large organizations, it either leads to arse-licking or to massive and totally ineffective bureaucracy, the latter introduced to eliminate the arse-licking problem. It's actually a cop-out. By all means pay people on, say, a seniority basis, but the corollary is that you must then be brave enough to discipline and if necessary remove the incompetent and inefficient. Just saying "you can't have a pay rise this year, mate, cos you haven't met your targets" does not work.

David Vance said...

The NUT are a marxist rabble with no interest in the prospects of the children they teach. I agree good taechers should get first rate rewards and bad teachers should be sacked. Alas that is not going to happen.

cramerj said...

Is not the problem of performance based pay is -
1. Who does the judging.
2. Who decides who does what.
In surgery , investment, litigation and other such activities the best people often handle the riskiest cases. So do not get the average results that the average operator does.
so what is performance?

Snafu said...

I thought Labour tried to introduce "contextual value added" as a form of assessment.

Teaching or Policing should not be exempt from recognising good performance and trying to remove poor performers. It's all too easy to blame poor teaching on poor quality students.

Mark Wadsworth said...

A formalised 'performance related pay' would be a nightmare and probably counter-productive (as previous commenters explain).

But there is nothing wrong with a school paying the good teachers more than the bad teachers, even if this is on a fairly subjective basis. Result? The not-so-good teachers either try harder or get cheesed off and leave teaching.